History

EMU Library Announcements

New Database - Detroit Free Press (1831-1999)

The EMU Library is happy to announce that we have added Detroit Free Press Historical (1831-1999) to our selection of databases.

From the publisher:

"Researchers will be able to study significant events as they appeared in contemporary news accounts, such as daily coverage of the Great Lakes trade industry, the early days of Ford and General Motors, as well as almost forgotten car manufacturers such as Packard and Hudson.  The Detroit Free Press also recounts the founding of the Republican Party in Jackson, MI in 1854, and includes detailed coverage from the battlefield of the American Civil War.   As Detroit grew into a large city, renowned architects built manufacturing facilities, skyscrapers and mansions. The newspaper follows the works of Gordon Lloyd, Sheldon and Mortimer Smith, Albert Kahn, and Cass Gilbert, as well as the construction of Detroit’s Neo-Classical, Beaux Arts, Art Deco, and Arts and Crafts buildings and homes.

The Detroit Free Press is also a rich source of genealogical and local history information. The growth of the mining, timber and auto industries attracted migrants from across Europe and the American South.  Before the American Civil War, Detroit also played a crucial role in the Underground Railroad serving as the last stop in the journey to freedom in Canada.  Additionally, in the early 1900’s the evolution of the automotive industry drew many people to Detroit to work on the auto assembly line.  Within the pages of the Detroit Free Press genealogists can find local news stories, ads from family business, accounts of city, county and state government meetings, in addition to obituaries, marriage and birth announcements — all which tell the story of Michigan’s rich history."

Access Detroit Free Press Historical (1831-1999) from our list of databases or here.

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